Wadi Shab

Last Friday, K and I went on a hike in Wadi Shab, which is a couple of hours’ drive down the coast from Muscat. It’s a scenic drive, though this doesn’t do it justice.

highway scenery

Wadi means “valley” or “watercourse” in Arabic. Two posts ago I mentioned that it means “hamlet” in Hindi, but I’m guessing it’s Urdu and shares some etymology with the Arabic word. For what it’s worth, I think most of the hamlets in Oman would be found in or near wadis, because a lot of the countryside doesn’t look particularly habitable (see photo above).

Anyway, there was parking and public bathrooms where the wadi passes under the highway, and because it was the weekend, there were lots of people around picnicking and such. To get to the trail, you have to cross this river.

River

Normally there are boats to take you across for a small fee, but none of the boatmen were working that day and the river is only about waist-deep, so we waded across. I’m not sure what clothes are best for this sort of adventure, but I was wearing hiking pants and semi-disposable canvas shoes that were pretty comfortable even when sopping wet. K said that he would go across barefoot next time and carry his hiking boots (he was wearing sneakers this time), but I was kind of squicked about the squishy riverbed, so I probably will not be doing this part barefoot.

The trail starts in this grove of palm trees on the other side of the river.

oasis

Which is pretty and all, but the scenery gets more dramatic as you go into the canyon.

canyon

 

canyon 2

And then the canyon narrows and the real fun begins.

wadi 1

There were tons of people grilling and chilling here, and I noticed that in some spots the draft was as cool as air-conditioning. I’m sorry to report that there was a lot of trash around, too, which is really sad. I’m not sure if a crew comes and cleans up occasionally, but in the meantime, ick.

wadi 2

Still, the water was beautiful.

K’s sneakers were full of pebbles from the river, so we paused at a little pool to rinse our feet.

rest

And later to watch some kids cliff-jumping. cliff-diving

When the canyon widened a bit, there was a huge boulder field that we didn’t think to photograph because we were still looking for the trail that had disappeared and trying not to break our ankles. After the canyon turned left, we kept going up and up and then realized that the way to the cave K had heard about was through the pools at the bottom, not along the sides. We were probably standing somewhere above it here.

pools

Some of the pools were too deep to wade across so we left our backpack near a pile of other backpacks and began the swimming portion of our outing.

pool

Everything beyond this was essentially a natural waterpark. In fact, I think some waterparks are designed to approximate these kinds of rocks and pools. It’s weird when natural things remind me of fake things.

Kids were jumping off ledges and paddling around, and the water was lovely. We’re used to swimming in the super-salty sea though, so staying afloat in the freshwater required some effort, especially with shoes on. K removed his sneakers to go investigate the cave at the back but I’m a coward and have seen too many scary movies, so I stayed back. He reported that he had to go underwater through a passage about 8 feet long to get in, and that the cave was very beautiful but there was nothing on the walls to grab so everyone was sort of awkwardly treading water as they looked around. Sounds like a death-trap to me. Maybe next time.

When we’d had enough and realized the sun was going to go down soon, we made our way back through the boulder field.

boulder field

I love bouldering, even in flimsy canvas shoes.

It was definitely getting late as we made our way back.

canyon 3
We really should start these hikes earlier in the day.

Anyway, this was pleasantly tiring (we walked, bouldered, swam, bouldered, walked—almost like a triathlon! or something) and unlike any hike we’ve ever done. It is high on my growing list of stuff to do with visitors, should we be lucky enough to get any. Come see us! We’ll take you to Wadi Shab!

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  1. #1 by bonnie on August 28, 2014 - 8:45 am

    Super beautiful! The cave exploring sounds terrifying to me too. Reminds me a little of Zion national park and the narrows. I wish we could visit!:

    • #2 by movingmatters on August 29, 2014 - 12:14 am

      Did I tell you about how I was sure you’d said Joshua Tree was your favorite and so I put it high on my list, and it was only after I went that I realized you’d said Zion was your favorite? Good thing all of these parks are pretty cool or I would’ve been way disappointed. 🙂

  2. #3 by Susannah on August 28, 2014 - 9:30 am

    Wow, this hike was even more amazing than I realized from the instagram photos. I thought you were just swimming _along_ the hike instead of swimming as _part of_ the hike. I definitely want to do this when we come! Also, I love the photo of you from the back mid-stride in the canyon. Your shirt matches the landscape and it looks like a beautiful painting.

  3. #4 by movingmatters on August 29, 2014 - 12:41 am

    I passed your comment about his photo onto K. 🙂 He’s gotten good at the phone photography.

  4. #5 by Joel on September 10, 2014 - 8:28 pm

    I totally want to go.

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